2313 Inc.

Think Like a Manager To Help Grow Your Career

2313 Inc. Think Like a Manager

Learning to think and work like a manager gives you the perspective you need to earn professional recognition and reach your goals.

2313 Inc. is committed to helping entry-level business professionals find success in all they do. Be sure to follow us on Facebook for our latest company updates and announcements: https://www.facebook.com/2313incbusiness/

Great managers aren’t just born overnight. Sure, some people naturally possess some of the skills necessary to excel at management, but most great managers are great because they have years of experience and learning on their side. 

What can you do to prepare yourself for a management position? Learn and practice the necessary skills – no matter where you are in your career. Peter Drucker, a well-known management consultant and educator, is considered the father of management studies. He broke the manager’s duties down into five basic tasks:

1.    Sets Objectives

2.    Organizes

3.    Motivates and Communicates

4.    Measures

5.    Develops People 

Encourage employees and sales associates to develop their understanding of business and management practices. Drucker’s management tasks inspired the following tips that will teach you to think and work as a manager, no matter where you are in your career.

Learn more about a career at 2313 Inc. on the 2313 Inc. Careers page.

Keep Developing Management Skills

There’s always something new to learn about management and business. Keep your skills sharp by reading new management books or even finding online classes to improve your management skills. Then, create a study group at work to support and apply what you learn to real-world problems. You know the old saying: practice makes perfect!

Connect With Your Team

Tell your team members, team leader, and supervisor that you want to contribute to your team’s growth. Come up with a pitch for a team-building activity, a volunteer project, or a social event that will improve team cohesion and productivity.

Find a Mentor

Some companies have formal mentorship programs, though that’s not completely necessary in order to find a mentor. Your supervisor might be interested in mentoring you, or you can look for a mentor at a networking event. Mentorship will improve your management expertise and develop strong professional relationships, which you can use as resources once you become a manager.

Don’t Keep Your Career Goals a Secret

How will you advance in your career if you don’t tell anyone about your goals? Let your supervisor know that you’re interested in becoming a manager. Complete your regular assignments and volunteer for special projects when you have the time to do them well to show that you’re willing to go above and beyond.

Becoming a manager will help you to advance in your career and develop the skills you need as a leader. Make a commitment to your future by using these strategies to increase your skills and your opportunities for advancement.

Seven Must-Watch Movies for Salespeople

2313 Inc. Seven Must-Watch Movies for Salespeople

Here are 7 flicks worth watching for anyone that works in sales.

We are 2313 Inc., changing the way businesses acquire and retain clients. Learn more at http://2313inc.com/

It’s always fun watching movies we can relate to professionally. Many films have made a major impact on pop-culture and the way our society views the “prototypical salesman.” Sales is not easy work, but it’s the best crash course in succeeding within business. Here are six movies (and a TV show) that everyone in the sales world should be watching.

The Pursuit of Happyness

This one takes a different approach and shows the positives in a sales career. The protagonist uses his role as a sales professional to teach his son valuable lessons in hard work, perseverance and determination.

 Death of a Salesman

Arthur Miller’s famous play features Willy Loman, the salesman who just can’t catch a break. While this story is more about failure and the inability to adapt and change, it’s also about the power of persuasion, and how some people, like Loman, just aren’t made for the world of sales. It’s a sad tale about what can happen when you’re in over your head, even when you have the right tools.

Wall Street

Michael Douglas’ Gordon Gekko taught us that “greed is good” because you’ll work hard for what you want. “Wall Street” show us how the love of money can bring down great men, but also leaves us with a ton of memorable sales tips and valuable one-liners.

Tin Men

This is a comedy about two rival salesmen who are unscrupulous in both sales and life. They find success in the corrupt and shady world of Aluminum Siding sales, but that comes to a halt when the Home Improvement Commission begins cracking down on sleazy sales practices. It’s humorous look on the shoddy world of sales past and how sleazy salesmen adapted to change.

Glengarry Glen Ross

Desperate salesmen wade through the waters of a Chicago-based real estate firm, learning just how hard it is to stay ahead of the game. This film is gritty and tough to watch for those who’ve experienced the harsh reality of sales. Glengarry gave us a good look into the lives of both good and bad salespeople, and it also taught us the golden rule: Always Be Closing.

The Wolf of Wall Street

Like “Wall Street,” this is another look into the shady sales practices on the trading floor and just how far some will go to make that deal. Based on a true story, this film show us just how jaded one can become when money is the ultimate goal. It also shows us the power of a good pitch, even when selling something as simple as pen.

Mad Men

No, this isn’t a movie, but this television phenomenon brings us to the world of 1960s advertising, where personality, contacts and knowing how to close a deal were just as important then as they are now.

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Creating Your Own Professional Development Plan

Creating Your Own Professional Development Plan 2313 Inc.

Creating a professional development plan focused on your career growth will help you reach your goal.

Resources for professional development are available in many locations. Local colleges, technical schools, and public libraries offer short and long-term programs to improve professional skills. The Internet is another source of educational opportunities, featuring blogs devoted to professional development and improving business skills. Once you know what you want to study, it’s time to create a development plan that meets your needs. Here are some ideas that will help you get started:

What Do You Know?

Determine what you know and what you want to learn. Create a list of skills you use every day and identify the skills you want to improve. If your goal is career advancement, review job descriptions that interest you and add the required skills to your list.

How Will You Learn?

There are lots of resources available to you when you begin studying: books, continuing education, online courses, and more. Choose the type of learning that works best for you.

Time and Money

Review your daily, weekly, and monthly schedule and reserve time for professional development. Even a small amount of time devoted to reading a new book will improve your abilities over time. If you’re interested in taking a class, you should create a realistic budget and start saving now.

Stay on Track

Track your progress as you follow your professional development plan. Keep a journal, and record the books you read and classes you attended. Include your big and small victories; any progress is good progress. Take notes on the subject areas that require more training.

Find a Mentor

A mentor is someone in your profession with greater experience who is interested in sharing their skills. Search for mentoring opportunities in your professional community. Your employer may offer a program, or a colleague may be willing to share her expertise over a cup of coffee.

Volunteer to Do More

Opportunity comes to those who ask for it. If you want to learn new skills, let your supervisor know that you’re interested. Volunteer for projects that require that you improve or learn a new skill. Learning new skills will keep you motivated and will help improve your confidence.

How a Focus on Team Bonding Helps Your Business

2313 Inc. How a Focus on Team Bonding Helps Your Business

2313 Inc. is a business and consulting firm based in Farmington Hills, MI. Learn more about our company at http://www.2313inc.com

We’re all aware of media representations of team building exercises, like trust falls and camping trips that usually turn out to be a comedy of errors. But that’s media, not real life, and in real life, team bonding can be a huge part of building a successful team. We’ve all worked at jobs where there was little to no team unity, or where a corporate culture was handed down from on high in an attempt to foster such unity, but which failed to take the real experience of workers into consideration.

Teams where coworkers not only get along, but know each other’s strengths and weaknesses, are more successful. People know who to go to for specific projects or challenges, they know who they can trust to solve certain problems. They know how to work together to achieve goals, instead of trying to out-perform one another.

There are some managers who feel that they should pit their employees against one another so they push themselves to achieve as much as possible, but more often than not this simply leads to employee burnout. Similarly, teams which lack in unity often result in employees thinking that they need to do everything themselves, which can lead to burnout as well.

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Team building doesn’t have to take the form of field trips and such, but can be accomplished by simply bringing people together and getting them to talk about their own strengths and weaknesses, and having people work on projects together. These projects can be exercises specifically designed for team building, or they can be actual projects. And unless you’re planning on working right alongside your employees, it might be best to step back and leave teams to themselves sometimes.

It’s important that they know their managers as well, and trust them if they have concerns, but you don’t want to put them on the spot and observe them. Bosses who micromanage can not only harm team unity, but turn that team against themselves.

10 Reasons To Always Tell the Truth at Work

2313 Inc. 10 Reasons To Always Tell the Truth at Work

Flickr CC via Novartis AG

Telling the truth is a simple strategy for igniting integrity and moving your career—and reputation—in the right direction.

Always telling the truth is an actual, practical, and reasonable strategy to use during your workday. Telling the truth provides useful tools for self-review and decision-making when you’re facing a complex problem with a variety of factors. Put these strategies into practice and you’ll understand that not only does the truth set you free, it’s a core value of any business strategy.

Keep Your Cool

Telling the truth doesn’t mean speaking from a place of anger or strong emotions. If your temper starts to rise, pause and take a breath in order to calm down. Count to 10—or up to 100—pick the number that gives you time to develop a thoughtful response to the situation that respects the other person’s point of view without silencing your own truth.

Listen and Learn

Upon hearing someone saying something you disagree with, we’re often prompted to immediately start framing a rebuttal. When that happens we’ve stopped listening. Our rebuttals are most often about making a point that’s more inline with our version of the truth than it is to actually communicating with someone. Listen and learn.

Experience Empathy

Empathy requires that you be able to imagine yourself in someone else’s situation. Empathy at work is an essential tool to improve work relations with your team members. It gives you a creative advantage at work since it expands your perspective. Someone who has empathy is able to imagine solutions to problems for a colleague or client’s perspective.

Lies Change Size

Sometimes we’re tempted to tell a lie so that we appear bigger—more successful, more powerful, more popular. When avoiding the truth in the hope that we’ll look better to other people we actually hurting ourselves. Before a social or networking session review the things that you’ve done in your life that make you proud. Don’t let a conversation become a competition. Let authenticity and honesty guide your questions and answers.

Develop Discretion

When someone shares something in confidence, treat what he or she shares with consideration and care. If you have questions about what you’ve been told, about whom it’s okay to share it with, ask the source for answers. Never pass on information that’s mean-spirited or negative—that’s just gossip and it hurts you and the people it’s about.

To learn how you can join the 2313 Inc. team today, check out our latest openings on CareerBuilder: http://www.careerbuilder.com/jobs/company/chn48w5wt4wvb2nzmb8/2313-inc

10 Business Books You Need to Read Right Now

2313 Inc 10 Business Books You Need to Read Right Now

Flickr CC via Tim McFarlane

Learn more about 2313 Inc. on our website: http://www.2313inc.com/

Don’t just sit there—learn! You may think you’re done with school but you’re not done with education. Continued success and achievement requires an agile mind chock-full of new ideas and fresh approaches to problem-solving.

Today’s business arena is global and competition has increased exponentially. Simply stated, there are more smart people out there and they share your goals and sometimes the same markets you serve.

So it’s time to buckle down because your business success requires continuing education. And these 10 business books will propel you forward with the information and aptitude required to succeed.

Rookie Smarts: Why Learning Beats Knowing in the New Game of Work

Liz Wiseman

Experience is a barrier that prevents you from imagining new ideas. Rookies are open to experimenting, testing, and risk. This quality of openness makes them more productive than veterans. Rookies are people of all ages starting something new, following a dream, and determined to make it work.

The Innovators: How a Group of Hackers, Geniuses, and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution

Walter Isaacson

Berners-Lee, Gates, Jobs, and Wozniak contributed to the digital revolution, which began in the 1840s. Issacson, author of the bestselling Steve Jobs’ biography, profiles creative geek, geniuses, and hackers and delivers inspirational stories and a deeper understanding of the technological revolution’s evolution.

#Girlboss

Sophia Amouruso

Following your passion requires a plan. It’s easier if you find someone able to provide practical advice. Amoruso is the Nasty Gal you need to listen to before you begin your journey. Her online retail site, Nasty Gal, brought great success. But she got there after a tough life on the streets that included dumpster diving and a daily struggle to survive.

How to Speak Money: What the Money People Say—And What It Really Means

John Lanchester

Money talks and you usually walk away from the conversation scratching your head wondering what it all means. Finance is complicated and confusing: Lanchester clarifies capitalism’s argot. You’ll appreciate his plainspoken explanations of the World Bank, hedge funds, and the IMF—whatever that is.

The Hard Thing About Hard Things: Building a Business When There Are No Easy Answers

Ben Horowitz

Horowitz was trained as an engineer and became the CEO of Loudcloud, which produced Opsware, which was purchased by HP for $1 billion in 2007. During that time he struggled with failure, bankruptcy, and personal tragedy—his wife’s life-threatening illness. Read this book to gain insight into the real struggles faced and overcome by a brilliant, yet imperfectly human, entrepreneur.

Zero to One: Notes on Startups, or How to Build the Future

Peter Thiel

While teaching at Stanford the author, and founder of PayPal, delivered a series of lectures that invigorated the imaginations of a new generation of entrepreneurs and innovators. Need more convincing? Thiel is a billionaire: sometimes that’s all you need to know.

Delivering Happiness: A Path To Profits, Passion, And Purpose

Tony Hsieh

Did a failed worm farm lead to Zappos’ domination as an online shoe retailer? That’s one of the first failures perennial entrepreneur Tony Hsieh encountered on his path to success. He’s a smart kid who didn’t like school but loved to learn and test out his moneymaking ideas, which lead to a revolution in customer service.

Give and Take: Why Helping Others Drives Our Success

Adam Grant

Success in business is achieved through being ruthless and selfish. The author, an organizational psychologist at Wharton, shares research that refutes this assumption. His studies reveal leading professionals achieve success by consistently creating value for others. Do good. Earn big.

ReWork

Jason Fried and David Heinemeier Hansson

The authors founded 37Signals, a web design company that has also produced popular project management solutions Basecamp and Backpack. Here they rewrite the rules for running a business. It’s full of important lessons for Internet industrialists and just about anyone else who’s reaching for the stars.

Purple Cow: Transform Your Business by Being Remarkable

Seth Godin

Godin is the go-to guy for insight about marketing, storytelling, and connecting your message with right audience. This book is built out of short chapters featuring fast access to innovative ideas about pricing, promotion, and publicity. It will inspire you to include a Purple Cow into everything you create. You’ve got to read the book to learn what a Purple Cow actually is.

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Making the Company Meeting Matter

2313 Inc Making the Company Meeting Fun

Flickr CC via Cvent

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Meetings can be one of the worst parts of your day if you’re not engaged with them. If they’re not productive, meetings can suck time out of the day and the life-force out of the employee. But that doesn’t mean we can simply do away with meetings altogether. Rather, we need to make our meetings better, faster, and more engaging. So how can we make one of work’s most boring necessities more productive?

Go Outside

Office life can be tough: lots of sitting, staring at a computer, perhaps next to a small window which only reminds you that life outside still exists. It’s a good idea to bring your workers back into the real world—physically! Fresh air and sunshine can be rejuvenating and relaxing. A simple change of scenery can do wonders.

Do Something Different

If your meetings are the exact same every time, everyone will be bored and probably tune out useful information. By bringing in a guest speaker, you can liven up meetings with some novelty. Get employees to think in new ways by allowing someone else to step in and speak to them. If you get great conversation going, you’re likely to get great debate and innovations.

Join the 2313 Inc. team today by checking out our open positions on CareerBuilder.

Make it Fun

Even though meetings are a part of life, they don’t have to be a snooze-fest. If you want your team to be enthusiastic and energetic, you need to exemplify those traits yourself. If employees see you in a good mood, they’ll pick it up themselves. Do name games; bring food (people will do anything for free food), acknowledge successes and good works; remind people why they’re there, what you hope to accomplish, and connect with your employees face-to-face.

Running a meeting isn’t always the most fun thing, either, but if you structure the meeting to move along at a brisk pace, keep an eye on the clock, incentivize participation, and connect with your workers, your next meeting might actually be fun.